York Castle Museum

Monday, August 20th 2018
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Noteworthy Information Appertaining to Current & Recent Happenings
Supernatural York Regular Feature
IS THE YORK CASTLE MUSEUM HAUNTED?
GHOSTLY APPARITIONS AND UNEARTHLY NOISES
A HISTORICAL OVERVIEW AND REPORTING OF WITNESS STATEMENTS AND PHOTOGRAPHIC EVIDENCE

aving been labelled with the somewhat dramatic epitaph of ‘the most haunted city in Europe’ it should therefore come as little surprise that contained within its medieval walls are numerous public buildings, dwellings and streets that an unnerving number of ghosts have determined to take up eternal residence, often vying for a single location.
    As such, when putting quill to paper in an endeavour to document such spectral occurrences, one is forced into the unenviable position of being unsure as to where to commence.
    However, never let it be said that an uncertainty of mind has ever resulted in an admission of defeat. Let us visit (at least for the moment in a metaphorical sense) the locality of the York Castle Museum. Situated on the south side of the River Foss and adjacent to the main highway known as Tower Street, the museum faces Clifford’s Tower, a surviving keep from the 13th century re-development of the site by Henry lll.
    Given the name of the museum, a continued lack of bewilderment will result from the knowledge that the site was originally home to a heavily fortified castle, one that can lay claim to a history as involved and troubled as that of York’s own.
    Originally constructed in 1068 by William the Conqueror in the aftermath of the Norman conquest of York, the castle went though many re-builds and developments until by the end of the fourteenth century the buildings had increasingly become used for the incarceration of both local villains and scoundrels and also for the detainment of political malfeasants. By the 16th century the tradition of carrying out capitol punishment by executing the criminal at Micklegate bar had switched to hanging the wretched victim from the top of Clifford’s Tower.
    In the proceeding years of the Restoration an expansion to the county facilities in the bailey was undertaken and improvements to the Grand Jury House and the Common Hall were also carried out. However, by the dawn of the eighteenth century    Continue Reading